Metropolitan Area Employment and Unemployment Summary

For release 10:00 a.m. (EDT) Friday, March 17, 2017		   USDL-17-0322

Technical information: 
 Employment:	(202) 691-6559  *  sminfo@bls.gov    *  www.bls.gov/sae
 Unemployment:	(202) 691-6392  *  lausinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/lau

Media contact:  (202) 691-5902  *  PressOffice@bls.gov


      METROPOLITAN AREA EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT -- JANUARY 2017


Unemployment rates were lower in January than a year earlier in 205 of the 388 
metropolitan areas, higher in 147 areas, and unchanged in 36 areas, the U.S. 
Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Eleven areas had jobless rates of 
less than 3.0 percent and 13 areas had rates of at least 10.0 percent. Nonfarm 
payroll employment increased over the year in 308 metropolitan areas, decreased 
in 75 areas, and was unchanged in 5 areas. The national unemployment rate in 
January was 5.1 percent, not seasonally adjusted, little changed from a year 
earlier.

Metropolitan Area Unemployment (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

In January, Ames, Iowa, had the lowest unemployment rate, 2.3 percent. El Centro,
Calif., had the highest unemployment rate, 19.6 percent. A total of 199 areas
had January jobless rates above the U.S. rate of 5.1 percent, 178 areas had
rates below it, and 11 areas had rates equal to that of the nation. (See table 1.)

Yuma, Ariz., had the largest over-the-year unemployment rate decrease in January 
(-2.1 percentage points). Twenty other areas had rate declines of at least 1.0 
percentage point. The largest over-the-year rate increase occurred in Rockford, 
Ill. (+3.3 percentage points).

Of the 51 metropolitan areas with a 2010 Census population of 1 million or more, 
Salt Lake City, Utah, had the lowest unemployment rate in January, 3.0 percent, 
closely followed by Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colo., 3.1 percent. Cleveland-Elyria, 
Ohio, had the highest jobless rate among the large areas, 6.6 percent. Twenty-seven
large areas had over-the-year unemployment rate decreases, 20 had increases, and
4 had no change. The largest over-the-year rate decrease occurred in Las Vegas-
Henderson-Paradise, Nev. (-1.4 percentage points). The largest over-the-year rate
increase was in Cleveland-Elyria, Ohio (+1.5 percentage points).

 __________________________________________________________________________________
|                                                                                  |
|         Metropolitan Area Employment and Unemployment Data Changes               |
|                                                                                  |
| In accordance with annual practices, historical data have been revised in tables |
| 1 through 4 of this news release. For detailed information on the revisions, see |
| the box notes at the end of this news release.                                   |
|__________________________________________________________________________________|


Metropolitan Division Unemployment (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

Eleven of the most populous metropolitan areas are made up of 38 metropolitan 
divisions, which are essentially separately identifiable employment centers. In 
January, San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, Calif., had the lowest 
unemployment rate among the divisions, 3.1 percent. Detroit-Dearborn-Livonia, 
Mich., and Elgin, Ill., had the highest division rates, 7.2 percent each. 
(See table 2.)

In January, 29 metropolitan divisions had over-the-year unemployment rate 
decreases, 8 had increases, and 1 had no change. The largest over-the-year rate 
declines occurred in Lawrence-Methuen Town-Salem, Mass.-N.H., and 
Taunton-Middleborough-Norton, Mass. (-1.1 percentage points each). The largest 
over-the-year rate increase occurred in Detroit-Dearborn-Livonia, Mich. 
(+1.0 percentage point).

Metropolitan Area Nonfarm Employment (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

In January, 308 metropolitan areas had over-the-year increases in nonfarm payroll
employment, 75 had decreases, and 5 had no change. The largest over-the-year
employment increases occurred in New York-Newark-Jersey City, N.Y.-N.J.-Pa.
(+158,000), Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas (+135,400), and Atlanta-
Sandy Springs-Roswell, Ga. (+96,800). The largest over-the-year percentage gain
in employment occurred in Ithaca, N.Y. (+5.5 percent), followed by Yuba City,
Calif. (+5.4 percent), and Grants Pass, Ore., and Lake Charles, La. (+5.3 percent
each). (See table 3.)

The largest over-the-year decreases in employment occurred in Lafayette, La.
(-8,800), Houma-Thibodaux, La. (-6,600), and Peoria, Ill. (-4,700). The largest
over-the-year percentage decrease in employment occurred in Casper, Wyo. 
(-9.5 percent), followed by Houma-Thibodaux, La. (-7.2 percent), and Lafayette, 
La. (-4.3 percent).
	
Over the year, nonfarm employment rose in 46 of the 51 metropolitan areas with
a 2010 Census population of 1 million or more, fell in 4 areas, and was unchanged 
in Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Conn. The largest over-the-year
percentage increase in employment in these large metropolitan areas occurred
in Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Fla. (+4.6 percent), followed by Dallas-Fort Worth-
Arlington, Texas (+4.0 percent), and Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Ga., and
Nashville-Davidson--Murfreesboro--Franklin, Tenn. (+3.7 percent each). The largest
over-the-year percentage decrease in employment occurred in Oklahoma City, Okla.
(-0.6 percent), followed by Rochester, N.Y. (-0.5 percent), Milwaukee-Waukesha-
West Allis, Wis. (-0.2 percent), and New Orleans-Metairie, La. (-0.1 percent).

Metropolitan Division Nonfarm Employment (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

In January, nonfarm payroll employment increased in 34 of the 38 metropolitan
divisions over the year, and fell in 4. The largest over-the-year increase in
employment among the metropolitan divisions occurred in New York-Jersey City-
White Plains, N.Y.-N.J. (+123,600), followed by Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas
(+105,600), and Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, Calif. (+62,600). The largest
over-the-year decrease in employment occurred in Lake County-Kenosha County,
Ill.-Wis. (-3,700), followed by Dutchess County-Putnam County, N.Y. (-2,100),
and Lawrence-Methuen Town-Salem, Mass.-N.H., and Lynn-Saugus-Marblehead,
Mass.(-200 each). (See table 4.)

The largest over-the-year percentage increase in employment among the metropolitan
divisions occurred in Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas (+4.3 percent), followed by Gary,
Ind. (+3.5 percent), and Camden, N.J., and Tacoma-Lakewood, Wash. (+3.4 percent each).
The largest over-the-year percentage decrease occurred in Dutchess County-Putnam County,
N.Y. (-1.5 percent), followed by Lake County-Kenosha County, Ill.-Wis. (-0.9 percent),
Lynn-Saugus-Marblehead, Mass. (-0.4 percent), and Lawrence-Methuen Town-Salem, Mass.-
N.H. (-0.2 percent).

_____________
The State Employment and Unemployment news release for February is scheduled to 
be released on Friday, March 24, 2017, at 10:00 a.m. (EDT). The Metropolitan 
Area Employment and Unemployment news release for February is scheduled to be 
released on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, at 10:00 a.m. (EDT).


 _____________________________________________________________________________
|                                                                             |
|           Changes to Local Area Unemployment Statistics Data                |
|                                                                             |
| Effective with the release of Regional and State Unemployment 2016 Annual   |
| Averages on February 28, 2017, civilian labor force and unemployment data   |
| for all states, the District of Columbia, and the seven modeled substate    |
| areas presented in tables 1 and 2 of this news release were revised from    |
| 2012 through 2016 to incorporate updated inputs, new population controls,   |
| re-estimation of models, and adjustments to new census division and         |
| national control totals. Revisions for all model-based area estimates       |
| were loaded into the BLS time series database at that time.                 |
|                                                                             |
| Civilian labor force and unemployment data for the non-modeled metropolitan |
| areas and divisions presented in tables 1 and 2 of this news release have   |
| been revised for 2016 to incorporate updated inputs and adjustments to new  |
| state control totals. Revised estimates for these areas and divisions have  |
| not been loaded into the BLS time series database; therefore, they do not   |
| match the data for 2016 in this news release. Revisions for all non-modeled |
| metropolitan areas and divisions from 2012 through 2016 will be loaded into |
| the database on April 21, 2017. For more information,                       |
| see www.bls.gov/lau/launews1.htm.                                           |
|_____________________________________________________________________________|




 __________________________________________________________________________
|                                                                          |
|            Changes to Current Employment Statistics Data                 |
|                                                                          |
| Effective with this release, nonfarm payroll estimates for states and    |
| metropolitan areas (tables 3 and 4) have been revised as a result of     |
| annual benchmark processing to reflect 2016 employment counts primarily  |
| derived from the BLS Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages data. Not  |
| seasonally adjusted data beginning with April 2015 were revised. For     |
| more information on annual processing, see                               |
| www.bls.gov/sae/benchmark2017.pdf.                                       |
|__________________________________________________________________________|



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Last Modified Date: March 17, 2017