Metropolitan Area Employment and Unemployment Summary

For release 10:00 a.m. (EDT) Friday, March 15, 2019		    USDL-19-0405

Technical information:
 Employment:	(202) 691-6559  *  sminfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/sae
 Unemployment:	(202) 691-6392  *  lausinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/lau

Media contact:	(202) 691-5902  *  PressOffice@bls.gov


	METROPOLITAN AREA EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT -- JANUARY 2019 


Unemployment rates were lower in January than a year earlier in 199 of
the 389 metropolitan areas, higher in 150 areas, and unchanged in 40
areas, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Twenty-two
areas had jobless rates of less than 3.0 percent and six areas had rates
of at least 10.0 percent. Nonfarm payroll employment increased over the
year in 53 metropolitan areas and was essentially unchanged in 336 areas.
The national unemployment rate in January was 4.4 percent, not seasonally
adjusted, little changed from a year earlier.

Metropolitan Area Unemployment (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

In January, Ames, IA, had the lowest unemployment rate, 1.9 percent. El
Centro, CA, had the highest unemployment rate, 18.5 percent. A total of
198 areas had January jobless rates below the U.S. rate of 4.4 percent,
176 areas had rates above it, and 15 areas had rates equal to that of
the nation. (See table 1.)

Ocean City, NJ, had the largest over-the-year unemployment rate decrease
in January (-1.7 percentage points). An additional 17 areas had rate
declines of at least 1.0 percentage point. The largest over-the-year rate
increase occurred in Panama City, FL (+1.6 percentage points).

Of the 51 metropolitan areas with a 2010 Census population of 1 million
or more, Nashville-Davidson--Murfreesboro--Franklin, TN, had the lowest
unemployment rate in January, 2.7 percent. Cleveland-Elyria, OH, had the
highest jobless rate among the large areas, 5.2 percent. Twenty-eight
large areas had over-the-year unemployment rate decreases, 16 had
increases, and 7 had no change. The largest rate decrease occurred in 
Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara Falls (-1.0 percentage point). The largest
over-the-year rate increase was in Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, CO (+1.0
percentage point).

  ____________________________________________________________________
 |								      |
 |    Metropolitan Area Employment and Unemployment Data Changes      |
 |								      |
 | In accordance with annual practices, historical data have been     |
 | revised in tables 1 through 4 of this news release. For detailed   |   
 | information on the revisions, see the box notes at the end of the  |
 | news release.	                                              |
 |____________________________________________________________________|


Metropolitan Division Unemployment (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

Eleven of the most populous metropolitan areas are made up of 38 metropolitan
divisions, which are essentially separately identifiable employment centers.
In January, San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, CA, had the lowest
unemployment rate among the divisions, 2.5 percent. Elgin, IL, had the highest
division rate, 6.6 percent. (See table 2.)

In January, 28 metropolitan divisions had over-the-year unemployment rate
decreases, 8 had increases, and 2 had no change. The largest rate decline
occurred in Philadelphia, PA (-0.9 percentage point). The largest over-the-
year jobless rate increase occurred in Elgin, IL (+1.2 percentage points).

Metropolitan Area Nonfarm Employment (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

In January, 53 metropolitan areas had over-the-year increases in nonfarm
payroll employment and 336 were essentially unchanged. The largest over-the-
year employment increases occurred in New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA
(+141,000), Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX (+100,100), and Houston-The
Woodlands-Sugar Land, TX (+83,800). The largest over-the-year percentage
gains in employment occurred in Midland, TX (+9.2 percent), Reno, NV (+7.2
percent), and Atlantic City-Hammonton, NJ (+6.3 percent). (See table 3.)

Over the year, nonfarm employment rose in 31 of the 51 metropolitan areas
with a 2010 Census population of 1 million or more, while employment was
essentially unchanged in 20 areas. The largest over-the-year percentage
increases in employment in these large metropolitan areas occurred in
Nashville-Davidson--Murfreesboro--Franklin, TN, and Orlando-Kissimmee-
Sanford, FL (+3.9 percent each), Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, NV, and
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, AZ (+3.1 percent each), and Sacramento--
Roseville--Arden-Arcade, CA (+2.9 percent).

Metropolitan Division Nonfarm Employment (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

In January, nonfarm payroll employment increased in 12 of the 38 metropolitan
divisions over the year and was essentially unchanged in 26 divisions. The
largest over-the-year increase in employment among the metropolitan divisions
occurred in New York-Jersey City-White Plains, NY-NJ (+117,900), followed by
Dallas-Plano-Irving, TX (+78,100), and Chicago-Naperville-Arlington Heights,
IL (+56,400). (See table 4.)

The largest over-the-year percentage increases in employment occurred in
San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, CA (+4.0 percent), Dallas-
Plano-Irving, TX (+3.0 percent), and Lake County-Kenosha County, IL-WI
(+2.8 percent).

_____________
The State Employment and Unemployment news release for February is
scheduled to be released on Friday, March 22, 2019, at 10:00 a.m.
(EDT). The Metropolitan Area Employment and Unemployment news release 
for February is scheduled to be released on Wednesday, April 3, 2019,
at 10:00 a.m. (EDT).


  _______________________________________________________________
 |								 |
 |           Partial Federal Government Shutdown                 |
 |								 |
 | Some federal government agencies were shut down or operating	 | 
 | at reduced staffing levels during a lapse in appropriations	 | 
 | from December 22, 2018, through January 25, 2019. The Bureau	 | 
 | of Labor Statistics (BLS) was funded during the shutdown	 | 
 | period and was operating as usual. Data collection for the	 | 
 | household and establishment surveys occurred as scheduled.	 | 
 | Additional information is available online at		 | 
 | www.bls.gov/bls/shutdown_2019_empsit_qa.pdf.			 | 
 |_______________________________________________________________|

  _______________________________________________________________
 |   								 |
 |     Changes to Local Area Unemployment Statistics Data	 | 
 | 								 | 
 | Effective with the release of Regional and State Unemployment | 
 | 2018 Annual Averages on Thursday, February 28, 2019, civilian | 
 | labor force and unemployment data for all states, the	 | 
 | District of Columbia, and the modeled substate areas		 | 
 | presented in tables 1 and 2 of this news release were revised | 
 | from 2014 through 2018 to incorporate updated inputs, new	 | 
 | population controls, re-estimation of models, and adjustment	 | 
 | to new census division and national control totals. Revisions | 
 | to estimates for all model-based areas were loaded into the	 | 
 | BLS time series database at that time.			 | 
 |								 |
 | Civilian labor force and unemployment data for the non-modeled| 
 | metropolitan areas and divisions presented in tables 1 and 2	 | 
 | of this news release have been revised for 2018 to incorporate| 
 | updated inputs and adjustment to new state control totals.	 | 
 | Revised estimates for these areas and divisions have not been | 
 | loaded into the BLS time series database; therefore, the	 | 
 | database does not match the data for 2018 in this news	 | 
 | release. Revisions for all non-modeled metropolitan areas and | 
 | divisions from 2014 through 2018 will be loaded into the	 | 
 | database on April 19, 2019. For more information, see	 | 
 | www.bls.gov/lau/launews1.htm.				 | 
 |_______________________________________________________________|

  _______________________________________________________________
 |      							 | 
 |    Changes to Current Employment Statistics (CES) Data	 | 
 | 								 | 
 | Effective with this news release, all nonfarm payroll	 |
 | employment estimates for states and metropolitan areas	 | 
 | (tables 3 and 4) have been revised as a result of annual	 | 
 | benchmark processing to reflect 2018 employment counts	 | 
 | primarily from the BLS Quarterly Census of Employment and	 | 
 | Wages (QCEW), as well as updating of seasonal adjustment	 | 
 | factors. Not seasonally adjusted data beginning with April	 | 
 | 2017 and seasonally adjusted data beginning with January	 | 
 | 2014 were subject to revision. Some seasonally adjusted and	 | 
 | not seasonally adjusted series may have been revised back	 | 
 | to 1990. Information on annual benchmark processing is	 | 
 | available at www.bls.gov/web/laus/benchmark.pdf.		 | 
 |_______________________________________________________________|

  _______________________________________________________________
 | 								 |
 |           Change to Metropolitan Area Geography		 |
 | 								 |
 | Effective with this issuance, estimates are included for Twin |
 | Falls, ID, which the Office of Management and Budget 	 |
 | designated as a new metropolitan area in 2017.		 |
 |_______________________________________________________________|
 
 
 
 

The PDF version of the news release

News release charts

Supplemental Files Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Last Modified Date: March 15, 2019