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Advertising, Promotions, and Marketing Managers

Summary

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Video transcript available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8r-nFPlKELc.
Quick Facts: Advertising, Promotions, and Marketing Managers
2022 Median Pay $138,730 per year
$66.70 per hour
Typical Entry-Level Education Bachelor's degree
Work Experience in a Related Occupation See How to Become One
On-the-job Training None
Number of Jobs, 2022 389,000
Job Outlook, 2022-32 6% (Faster than average)
Employment Change, 2022-32 24,300

What Advertising, Promotions, and Marketing Managers Do

Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers plan programs to generate interest in products or services.

Work Environment

Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers typically work in an office setting. They may travel to meet with clients or media representatives. Most of these managers work full time, and some work more than 40 hours per week.

How to Become an Advertising, Promotions, or Marketing Manager

Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers typically need a bachelor’s degree. They also typically need work experience in a related occupation.

Pay

The median annual wage for advertising and promotions managers was $127,830 in May 2022.

The median annual wage for marketing managers was $140,040 in May 2022.

Job Outlook

Overall employment of advertising, promotions, and marketing managers is projected to grow 6 percent from 2022 to 2032, faster than the average for all occupations.

About 34,000 openings for advertising, promotions, and marketing managers are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.

State & Area Data

Explore resources for employment and wages by state and area for advertising, promotions, and marketing managers.

Similar Occupations

Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of advertising, promotions, and marketing managers with similar occupations.

More Information, Including Links to O*NET

Learn more about advertising, promotions, and marketing managers by visiting additional resources, including O*NET, a source on key characteristics of workers and occupations.

What Advertising, Promotions, and Marketing Managers Do About this section

Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers
Advertising managers work with sales staff to generate ideas for an ad campaign.

Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers plan programs to generate interest in products or services. They work with art directors, advertising sales agents, financial staff, and others to develop strategies and materials.

Duties

Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers typically do the following:

  • Work with department heads or staff to discuss topics such as budgets and contracts, creative vision, marketing plans, and media buying
  • Plan promotional campaigns, such as contests or giveaways, to boost brand loyalty and reach new customers
  • Plan advertising campaigns, including in which media—such as radio, television, or email—to advertise
  • Negotiate advertising contracts with clients and partners
  • Evaluate the look and feel of displays or websites in advertising or marketing campaigns
  • Initiate market research studies and analyze their findings to understand customer and market opportunities for businesses
  • Develop pricing and other strategies, such as how to acquire and retain customers and manage their data, for marketing products or services
  • Meet and strategize with clients to provide marketing or related advice
  • Direct the hiring and daily activities of advertising, promotions, and marketing staff

Advertising managers create interest among potential buyers of a product or service. They do this for a department, an entire organization, or individual projects (referred to as an account).

Advertising managers work with sales staff and others to generate ideas for an advertising campaign. They oversee the staff that develops the advertising. They work with the finance department to prepare a budget and cost estimates for the campaign. Often, advertising managers serve as liaisons between the client and the advertising or promotion agency that develops and places the ads.

Some advertising managers specialize in a particular field or type of advertising. For example, media directors determine the way in which an advertising campaign reaches customers, whether through radio, television, or various other media. Account executives have a different focus: they oversee client accounts but do not develop or supervise advertising projects themselves.

Promotions managers direct programs that combine advertising with purchasing incentives and target them to customers in media, in displays, or at events to increase sales. Purchasing incentives may include discounts, rebates, contests, and other programs to strengthen brand loyalty. Promotions managers also contribute to developing brand loyalty programs.

Marketing managers estimate demand and identify potential markets for products and services that an organization and its competitors offer. They may develop pricing and other strategies, such as ways to acquire and retain customers. They work with product development, public relations, and sales staff to help organizations maximize their profits and market share while ensuring customer satisfaction.

Work Environment About this section

Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers
Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers may travel to meet with clients or representatives of communications media.

Advertising and promotions managers held about 30,900 jobs in 2022. The largest employers of advertising and promotions managers were as follows:

Advertising, public relations, and related services 29%
Self-employed workers 27
Information 14
Management of companies and enterprises 7
Wholesale trade 2

Marketing managers held about 358,200 jobs in 2022. The largest employers of marketing managers were as follows:

Professional, scientific, and technical services 25%
Management of companies and enterprises 12
Finance and insurance 10
Wholesale trade 9
Manufacturing 7

Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers work with art directors, advertising sales agents, financial staff, and others to develop strategies and materials. Because their work affects a firm’s revenue, these managers also collaborate with top executives.

Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers typically work in an office setting. They may travel to meet with clients or media representatives. Their work may be stressful, particularly near deadlines.

Work Schedules

Most advertising, promotions, and marketing managers work full time. Some work more than 40 hours per week.

How to Become an Advertising, Promotions, or Marketing Manager About this section

Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers
These managers typically have previous work experience in advertising, marketing, promotions, or sales.

Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers typically need a bachelor’s degree. They also typically need work experience in a related occupation.

Education

Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers typically need a bachelor’s degree in a business field, such as marketing, or in a related field, such as communications. Relevant courses might include consumer behavior, market research, and art history.

Some employers prefer to hire candidates who have a master’s degree.

Advertising and marketing managers may begin as trainees or participate in mentoring or shadowing opportunities. In addition, completing an internship while in school may make candidates more attractive to prospective employers.

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

These managers typically need work experience in a related advertising, marketing, promotions, or sales occupation. For example, they may have worked as sales representatives, market research analysts, or public relations specialists.

Important Qualities

Analytical skills. Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers must be able to evaluate industry trends and determine the best strategies for their clients.

Communication skills. These workers must be able to collaborate with other managers and staff. They also must be persuasive in communicating with the public.

Creativity. Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers must be able to generate new and imaginative ideas.

Decision-making skills. These workers often must choose between competing advertising and marketing strategies put forward by staff.

Interpersonal skills. Managers must deal with a range of people and personalities in different roles, both inside and outside their organization.

Organizational skills. Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers must manage their time and budget efficiently while directing and motivating staff.

Pay About this section

Advertising, Promotions, and Marketing Managers

Median annual wages, May 2022

Marketing managers

$140,040

Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers

$138,730

Advertising, marketing, promotions, public relations, and sales managers

$132,820

Advertising and promotions managers

$127,830

Total, all occupations

$46,310

 

The median annual wage for advertising and promotions managers was $127,830 in May 2022. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $60,380, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $239,200.

The median annual wage for marketing managers was $140,040 in May 2022. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $76,790, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $239,200.

In May 2022, the median annual wages for advertising and promotions managers in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Information $146,900
Management of companies and enterprises 133,110
Advertising, public relations, and related services 131,190
Wholesale trade 107,860

In May 2022, the median annual wages for marketing managers in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Management of companies and enterprises $162,870
Finance and insurance 161,040
Professional, scientific, and technical services 148,810
Manufacturing 147,940
Wholesale trade 135,540

Most advertising, promotions, and marketing managers work full time. Some work more than 40 hours per week.

Job Outlook About this section

Advertising, Promotions, and Marketing Managers

Percent change in employment, projected 2022-32

Marketing managers

7%

Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers

6%

Advertising, marketing, promotions, public relations, and sales managers

5%

Total, all occupations

3%

Advertising and promotions managers

2%

 

Overall employment of advertising, promotions, and marketing managers is projected to grow 6 percent from 2022 to 2032, faster than the average for all occupations.

About 34,000 openings for advertising, promotions, and marketing managers are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.

Employment

Marketing managers will continue to be in demand as organizations use marketing campaigns to maintain and expand their market share. These managers will be sought after for their advice on crafting pricing strategies and finding new ways to reach customers.

The continued rise of electronic media will result in decreasing demand for print advertisements. However, the demand for advertising and promotions managers is expected to be concentrated in industries that rely on these workers to create digital media campaigns that target customers through the use of websites, social media, or live chats.

Employment projections data for advertising, promotions, and marketing managers, 2022-32
Occupational Title SOC Code Employment, 2022 Projected Employment, 2032 Change, 2022-32 Employment by Industry
Percent Numeric

SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program

Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers

389,000 413,300 6 24,300

Advertising and promotions managers

11-2011 30,900 31,400 2 600 Get data

Marketing managers

11-2021 358,200 381,900 7 23,700 Get data

State & Area Data About this section

Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS)

The Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) program produces employment and wage estimates annually for over 800 occupations. These estimates are available for the nation as a whole, for individual states, and for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas. The link(s) below go to OEWS data maps for employment and wages by state and area.

Projections Central

Occupational employment projections are developed for all states by Labor Market Information (LMI) or individual state Employment Projections offices. All state projections data are available at www.projectionscentral.org. Information on this site allows projected employment growth for an occupation to be compared among states or to be compared within one state. In addition, states may produce projections for areas; there are links to each state’s websites where these data may be retrieved.

CareerOneStop

CareerOneStop includes hundreds of occupational profiles with data available by state and metro area. There are links in the left-hand side menu to compare occupational employment by state and occupational wages by local area or metro area. There is also a salary info tool to search for wages by zip code.

Similar Occupations About this section

This table shows a list of occupations with job duties that are similar to those of advertising, promotions, and marketing managers.

Occupation Job Duties ENTRY-LEVEL EDUCATION Help on Entry-Level Education 2022 MEDIAN PAY Help on Median Pay
Advertising sales agents Advertising Sales Agents

Advertising sales agents sell advertising space to businesses and individuals.

High school diploma or equivalent $58,450
Art directors Art Directors

Art directors are responsible for the visual style and images in magazines, newspapers, product packaging, and movie and television productions.

Bachelor's degree $105,180
Editors Editors

Editors plan, review, and revise content for publication.

Bachelor's degree $73,080
Graphic designers Graphic Designers

Graphic designers create visual concepts, using computer software or by hand, to communicate ideas that inspire, inform, and captivate consumers.

Bachelor's degree $57,990
Market research analysts Market Research Analysts

Market research analysts study consumer preferences, business conditions, and other factors to assess potential sales of a product or service.

Bachelor's degree $68,230
Sales managers Sales Managers

Sales managers direct organizations' sales teams.

Bachelor's degree $130,600
Financial managers Financial Managers

Financial managers create financial reports, direct investment activities, and develop plans for the long-term financial goals of their organization.

Bachelor's degree $139,790
project management specialists Project Management Specialists

Project management specialists coordinate the budget, schedule, staffing, and other details of a project.

Bachelor's degree $95,370
Public relations managers and specialists Public Relations and Fundraising Managers

Public relations managers direct the creation of materials that will enhance the public image of their employer or client. Fundraising managers coordinate campaigns that bring in donations for their organization.

Bachelor's degree $125,620
public relations specialists image Public Relations Specialists

Public relations specialists create and maintain a positive public image for the clients they represent.

Bachelor's degree $67,440
Suggested citation:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Advertising, Promotions, and Marketing Managers,
at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/advertising-promotions-and-marketing-managers.htm (visited September 28, 2023).

Last Modified Date: Wednesday, September 6, 2023

What They Do

The What They Do tab describes the typical duties and responsibilities of workers in the occupation, including what tools and equipment they use and how closely they are supervised. This tab also covers different types of occupational specialties.

Work Environment

The Work Environment tab includes the number of jobs held in the occupation and describes the workplace, the level of physical activity expected, and typical hours worked. It may also discuss the major industries that employed the occupation. This tab may also describe opportunities for part-time work, the amount and type of travel required, any safety equipment that is used, and the risk of injury that workers may face.

How to Become One

The How to Become One tab describes how to prepare for a job in the occupation. This tab can include information on education, training, work experience, licensing and certification, and important qualities that are required or helpful for entering or working in the occupation.

Pay

The Pay tab describes typical earnings and how workers in the occupation are compensated—annual salaries, hourly wages, commissions, tips, or bonuses. Within every occupation, earnings vary by experience, responsibility, performance, tenure, and geographic area. For most profiles, this tab has a table with wages in the major industries employing the occupation. It does not include pay for self-employed workers, agriculture workers, or workers in private households because these data are not collected by the Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) survey, the source of BLS wage data in the OOH.

State & Area Data

The State and Area Data tab provides links to state and area occupational data from the Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) program, state projections data from Projections Central, and occupational information from the Department of Labor's CareerOneStop.

Job Outlook

The Job Outlook tab describes the factors that affect employment growth or decline in the occupation, and in some instances, describes the relationship between the number of job seekers and the number of job openings.

Similar Occupations

The Similar Occupations tab describes occupations that share similar duties, skills, interests, education, or training with the occupation covered in the profile.

Contacts for More Information

The More Information tab provides the Internet addresses of associations, government agencies, unions, and other organizations that can provide additional information on the occupation. This tab also includes links to relevant occupational information from the Occupational Information Network (O*NET).

2022 Median Pay

The wage at which half of the workers in the occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. Median wage data are from the BLS Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics survey. In May 2022, the median annual wage for all workers was $46,310.

On-the-job Training

Additional training needed (postemployment) to attain competency in the skills needed in this occupation.

Entry-level Education

Typical level of education that most workers need to enter this occupation.

Work experience in a related occupation

Work experience that is commonly considered necessary by employers, or is a commonly accepted substitute for more formal types of training or education.

Number of Jobs, 2022

The employment, or size, of this occupation in 2022, which is the base year of the 2022-32 employment projections.

Job Outlook, 2022-32

The projected percent change in employment from 2022 to 2032. The average growth rate for all occupations is 3 percent.

Employment Change, 2022-32

The projected numeric change in employment from 2022 to 2032.

Entry-level Education

Typical level of education that most workers need to enter this occupation.

On-the-job Training

Additional training needed (postemployment) to attain competency in the skills needed in this occupation.

Employment Change, projected 2022-32

The projected numeric change in employment from 2022 to 2032.

Growth Rate (Projected)

The percent change of employment for each occupation from 2022 to 2032.

Projected Number of New Jobs

The projected numeric change in employment from 2022 to 2032.

Projected Growth Rate

The projected percent change in employment from 2022 to 2032.

2022 Median Pay

The wage at which half of the workers in the occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. Median wage data are from the BLS Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics survey. In May 2022, the median annual wage for all workers was $46,310.