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Summary

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Video transcript available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FApd9FCZ3RQ.
Quick Facts: Pest Control Workers
2021 Median Pay $37,540 per year
$18.05 per hour
Typical Entry-Level Education High school diploma or equivalent
Work Experience in a Related Occupation None
On-the-job Training Moderate-term on-the-job training
Number of Jobs, 2020 86,800
Job Outlook, 2020-30 10% (As fast as average)
Employment Change, 2020-30 8,200

What Pest Control Workers Do

Pest control workers remove insects, rodents, and other pests that infest buildings and surrounding areas.

Work Environment

Pest control workers often kneel, bend, and crawl in tight spaces to inspect sites. Because there are health risks associated with pesticide use, workers are trained in pesticide safety and typically wear protective gear, which may include gloves, goggles, and respirators. Most pest control workers are employed full time. Working evenings and weekends is common.

How to Become a Pest Control Worker

Pest control workers typically need a high school diploma and receive on-the-job training. State laws require pest control workers to be licensed.

Pay

The median annual wage for pest control workers was $37,540 in May 2021.

Job Outlook

Employment of pest control workers is projected to grow 10 percent from 2020 to 2030, about as fast as the average for all occupations.

About 12,800 openings for pest control workers are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.

State & Area Data

Explore resources for employment and wages by state and area for pest control workers.

Similar Occupations

Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of pest control workers with similar occupations.

More Information, Including Links to O*NET

Learn more about pest control workers by visiting additional resources, including O*NET, a source on key characteristics of workers and occupations.

What Pest Control Workers Do About this section

Pest control workers
Pest control workers inspect a building and its premises for signs of pests.

Pest control workers remove unwanted pests, such as roaches, rodents, ants, and termites, that infest buildings and surrounding areas.

Duties

Pest control workers typically do the following:

  • Inspect buildings and premises for signs of pests or infestation
  • Determine the type of treatment needed to eliminate pests
  • Measure the dimensions of the area needing treatment
  • Estimate the cost of their services
  • Use baits and set traps to remove, control, or eliminate pests
  • Apply pesticides in and around buildings and other structures
  • Design and carry out pest management plans
  • Drive trucks equipped with power spraying equipment
  • Create barriers to prevent pests from entering a building

Unwanted pests that infest buildings and surrounding areas are a nuisance and may pose health and safety risks to occupants. Pest control workers control, manage, and remove these creatures from apartments, homes, offices, and other structures in a way that does not harm inhabitants and maintains the structural integrity of buildings.

To design and carry out integrated pest management plans, pest control workers must know the identity and biology of a wide range of pests. They also must know the best ways to control and remove the pests.

Although certain rodents and insects, such as mice and termites, are among the most common pests, some pest control workers also remove birds, squirrels, and other wildlife from homes and buildings.

Pest control workers’ position titles and job duties often vary by state.

The following are examples of types of pest control workers:

Pest control technicians are usually entry-level workers who identify potential and actual pest problems, conduct inspections, and design control strategies. They work directly with customers and use a limited range of pesticides.

Applicators use a wide range of pesticides and may specialize in an area of pest control:

  • Termite control workers may use chemicals or baiting techniques and modify structures to eliminate termites and prevent future infestations. Some also repair structural damage caused by termites and build barriers to separate pests from their food source.
  • Fumigators use gases, called fumigants, to treat specific kinds of pests or large-scale infestations. Fumigators seal all or part of an infested building before using hoses to fill the structure with fumigants. They post warning signs to keep people from going into the fumigated area and monitor it closely to detect and stop leaks.

Work Environment About this section

Pest control workers
Pest control workers must travel to a client’s home or business.

Pest control workers held about 86,800 jobs in 2020. The largest employers of pest control workers were as follows:

Exterminating and pest control services 88%
Self-employed workers 7

Pest control workers must travel to a client’s home or business. They work both indoors and outdoors, in all types of weather.

Injuries and Illnesses

Pest control workers have one of the highest rates of injuries and illnesses of all occupations. These workers are susceptible to strains and sprains because they may need to kneel, bend, and crawl in tight spaces. In addition, some pesticides are toxic and may be harmful to humans, so workers must take precautions when using such chemicals.

All pesticide products are reviewed and approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and workers must follow label directions. Pest control workers are trained and licensed for pesticide use and must wear protective equipment, including gloves, goggles, and respirators, to reduce the risk of harm.

Work Schedules

Most pest control workers are employed full time. Working evenings and weekends is common. Some work more than 40 hours per week.

How to Become a Pest Control Worker About this section

Pest control workers
State laws require pest control workers to be licensed.

Pest control workers typically need a high school diploma and receive on-the-job training. State laws require pest control workers to be licensed.

Many pest control companies require that employees have a driver’s license and a good driving record.

Education

Pest control workers typically need high school diploma or equivalent to enter the occupation. Employers may consider experienced candidates for some pest control jobs.

Training

Most pest control workers begin as technicians, typically receiving on-the-job training. They often study specialties such as rodent control, termite control, and fumigation. Technicians also must complete general training in pesticide use and safety. Pest control training can usually be completed in less than 3 months.

After completing training, workers are qualified to provide pest control services. Because pest control methods change, workers often attend continuing education classes.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Most states require pest control workers to be licensed. Licensure requirements vary by state, but workers usually must complete training and pass an exam. Some states have additional requirements, such as having a high school diploma or equivalent. States may have additional requirements for applicators. Check with your state regulatory agency for more information.

Advancement

Pest control workers typically advance as they gain experience. For example, applicators who have several years of experience may become supervisors. Some workers start their own pest management business.

Important Qualities

Bookkeeping skills. Pest control workers must keep accurate records of the hours they work, chemicals they use, and payments they collect. Self-employed workers, in particular, need these skills in order to run their business.

Customer-service skills. Pest control workers should be friendly and polite when they interact with customers at their homes or businesses.

Detail oriented. Because pest control workers apply potentially toxic chemicals, they must be able to follow instructions precisely to prevent harm to residents, pets, the environment, and themselves.

Physical stamina. Pest control workers may spend hours standing, bending, kneeling, or crawling. They also must be able to withstand uncomfortable conditions, such as summer heat in attics and winter cold in crawl spaces.

Pay About this section

Pest Control Workers

Median annual wages, May 2021

Total, all occupations

$45,760

Pest control workers

$37,540

Building cleaning and pest control workers

$29,640

 

The median annual wage for pest control workers was $37,540 in May 2021. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $28,620, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $58,660.

In May 2021, the median annual wages for pest control workers in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Exterminating and pest control services $37,460

Most pest control workers are employed full time. Working evenings and weekends is common. Some work more than 40 hours per week.

Job Outlook About this section

Pest Control Workers

Percent change in employment, projected 2020-30

Pest control workers

10%

Building cleaning and pest control workers

8%

Total, all occupations

8%

 

Employment of pest control workers is projected to grow 10 percent from 2020 to 2030, about as fast as the average for all occupations.

About 12,800 openings for pest control workers are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.

Employment

The growing number of invasive insect species, such as stink bugs, is expected to further increase demand for pest control services. Although some people may choose to control pests themselves, most customers prefer to hire professional pest control services.

Employment projections data for pest control workers, 2020-30
Occupational Title SOC Code Employment, 2020 Projected Employment, 2030 Change, 2020-30 Employment by Industry
Percent Numeric

SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program

Pest control workers

37-2021 86,800 95,000 10 8,200 Get data

State & Area Data About this section

Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS)

The Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) program produces employment and wage estimates annually for over 800 occupations. These estimates are available for the nation as a whole, for individual states, and for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas. The link(s) below go to OEWS data maps for employment and wages by state and area.

Projections Central

Occupational employment projections are developed for all states by Labor Market Information (LMI) or individual state Employment Projections offices. All state projections data are available at www.projectionscentral.com. Information on this site allows projected employment growth for an occupation to be compared among states or to be compared within one state. In addition, states may produce projections for areas; there are links to each state’s websites where these data may be retrieved.

CareerOneStop

CareerOneStop includes hundreds of occupational profiles with data available by state and metro area. There are links in the left-hand side menu to compare occupational employment by state and occupational wages by local area or metro area. There is also a salary info tool to search for wages by zip code.

Similar Occupations About this section

This table shows a list of occupations with job duties that are similar to those of pest control workers.

Occupation Job Duties ENTRY-LEVEL EDUCATION Help on Entry-Level Education 2021 MEDIAN PAY Help on Median Pay
Construction laborers and helpers Construction Laborers and Helpers

Construction laborers and helpers perform many tasks that require physical labor on construction sites.

See How to Become One $37,520
Grounds maintenance workers Grounds Maintenance Workers

Grounds maintenance workers install and maintain landscapes, prune trees or shrubs, and do other tasks to ensure that vegetation is attractive, orderly, and safe.

See How to Become One $35,460
Janitors and building cleaners Janitors and Building Cleaners

Janitors and building cleaners keep many types of buildings clean, sanitary, orderly, and in good condition.

No formal educational credential $29,760
Suggested citation:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Pest Control Workers,
at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/building-and-grounds-cleaning/pest-control-workers.htm (visited June 26, 2022).

Last Modified Date: Thursday, May 12, 2022

What They Do

The What They Do tab describes the typical duties and responsibilities of workers in the occupation, including what tools and equipment they use and how closely they are supervised. This tab also covers different types of occupational specialties.

Work Environment

The Work Environment tab includes the number of jobs held in the occupation and describes the workplace, the level of physical activity expected, and typical hours worked. It may also discuss the major industries that employed the occupation. This tab may also describe opportunities for part-time work, the amount and type of travel required, any safety equipment that is used, and the risk of injury that workers may face.

How to Become One

The How to Become One tab describes how to prepare for a job in the occupation. This tab can include information on education, training, work experience, licensing and certification, and important qualities that are required or helpful for entering or working in the occupation.

Pay

The Pay tab describes typical earnings and how workers in the occupation are compensated—annual salaries, hourly wages, commissions, tips, or bonuses. Within every occupation, earnings vary by experience, responsibility, performance, tenure, and geographic area. For most profiles, this tab has a table with wages in the major industries employing the occupation. It does not include pay for self-employed workers, agriculture workers, or workers in private households because these data are not collected by the Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) survey, the source of BLS wage data in the OOH.

State & Area Data

The State and Area Data tab provides links to state and area occupational data from the Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) program, state projections data from Projections Central, and occupational information from the Department of Labor's CareerOneStop.

Job Outlook

The Job Outlook tab describes the factors that affect employment growth or decline in the occupation, and in some instances, describes the relationship between the number of job seekers and the number of job openings.

Similar Occupations

The Similar Occupations tab describes occupations that share similar duties, skills, interests, education, or training with the occupation covered in the profile.

Contacts for More Information

The More Information tab provides the Internet addresses of associations, government agencies, unions, and other organizations that can provide additional information on the occupation. This tab also includes links to relevant occupational information from the Occupational Information Network (O*NET).

2021 Median Pay

The wage at which half of the workers in the occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. Median wage data are from the BLS Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics survey. In May 2021, the median annual wage for all workers was $45,760.

On-the-job Training

Additional training needed (postemployment) to attain competency in the skills needed in this occupation.

Entry-level Education

Typical level of education that most workers need to enter this occupation.

Work experience in a related occupation

Work experience that is commonly considered necessary by employers, or is a commonly accepted substitute for more formal types of training or education.

Number of Jobs, 2020

The employment, or size, of this occupation in 2020, which is the base year of the 2020-30 employment projections.

Job Outlook, 2020-30

The projected percent change in employment from 2020 to 2030. The average growth rate for all occupations is 8 percent.

Employment Change, 2020-30

The projected numeric change in employment from 2020 to 2030.

Entry-level Education

Typical level of education that most workers need to enter this occupation.

On-the-job Training

Additional training needed (postemployment) to attain competency in the skills needed in this occupation.

Employment Change, projected 2020-30

The projected numeric change in employment from 2020 to 2030.

Growth Rate (Projected)

The percent change of employment for each occupation from 2020 to 2030.

Projected Number of New Jobs

The projected numeric change in employment from 2020 to 2030.

Projected Growth Rate

The projected percent change in employment from 2020 to 2030.

2021 Median Pay

The wage at which half of the workers in the occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. Median wage data are from the BLS Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics survey. In May 2021, the median annual wage for all workers was $45,760.