Number and incidence rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by occupation, 2009

July 13, 2011

In 2009, the total number of reported nonfatal occupational injury and illness cases that required days away from work to recuperate was 1,238,490 cases for private industry, state government, and local government; the total incidence rate was 117 cases per 10,000 full-time workers.

Number, incidence rate, and median days away from work for nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work, selected occupations, private industry, state and local government, 2009
[Chart data]

There were 7 occupations in 2009 that had

  • at least 20,000 cases of nonfatal occupational injury or illness requiring days away from work,
  • an incidence rate of 300 or more cases (per 10,000 full-time workers),
  • at least one-tenth of one percent of total employment.

These occupations were police and sheriff 's patrol officers; nursing aides, orderlies and attendants; light or delivery service truck drivers; laborers and freight, stock and material movers; construction laborers; tractor-trailer truck drivers; and janitors and cleaners.

Among these 7 occupations, laborers and freight, stock, and material movers had the highest number of days-away-from-work injuries and illnesses cases: 64,910 (primarily in private industry); their incidence rate was 407 cases per 10,000 full-time workers.

Police and sheriff's patrol officers, which registered 35,590 cases of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses (primarily in local government), had the highest incidence rate: 603 cases per 10,000 full-time workers.

Nursing aides, orderlies, and attendants, with 50,620 cases and an incidence rate of 456, required a median of 5 days away from work to recuperate. Tractor-trailer truck drivers (47,790 cases, incidence rate of 328) and light or delivery service truck drivers (32,210 cases, incidence rate of 410) had the longest absences from work among these 7 occupations—a median of 15 and 14 days, respectively.

These data are from the Injuries, Illnesses, and Fatalities program. See "Nonfatal Occupational Injuries and Illnesses Requiring Days Away from Work, 2009" (HTML) (PDF), news release USDL-10-1546, to learn more.

SUGGESTED CITATION

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, The Economics Daily, Number and incidence rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by occupation, 2009 on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2011/ted_20110713.htm (visited October 22, 2014).

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