Contingent workers and education

August 01, 2005

Contingent workers are persons who do not expect their jobs to last or who reported that their jobs are temporary. Using the broadest estimate of contingency, 5.7 million workers were classified as contingent in February 2005, accounting for about 4 percent of total employment.

Employed contingent and noncontingent workers, age 25 to 64 years, percent distribution by educational attainment, February 2005
[Chart data—TXT]

Contingent workers age 25 to 64 were found at both ends of the educational attainment spectrum. Compared with noncontingent workers, contingent workers were more likely to have less than a high school diploma (16 percent compared with 9 percent) and more likely to hold at least a bachelor’s degree (37 percent compared with 33 percent).

These data are from a supplement to the February 2005 Current Population Survey. To find out more, see Contingent and Alternative Employment Arrangements, February 2005, news release USDL 05-1433.

SUGGESTED CITATION

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, The Editor's Desk, Contingent workers and education on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2005/jul/wk4/art04.htm (visited August 29, 2014).

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