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News Release Information

21-10-NEW
Thursday, January 07, 2021

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Employer-Reported Workplace Injuries and Illnesses in New York — 2019

Over 140,000 nonfatal workplace injuries and illnesses were reported among New York’s private industry employers in 2019, resulting in an incidence rate of 2.2 cases per 100 full-time equivalent workers, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. (See table A.) Chief Regional Economist Martin Kohli noted that New York was among 14 states and the District of Columbia that had an incidence rate of total recordable cases (TRC) significantly lower than the national rate of 2.8. (New York was 1 of 41 states and the District of Columbia for which statewide estimates are available. See Technical Note at the end of this release for more information about the survey.)

New York’s findings from the 2019 Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses include:

  • TRC incidence rates in private industry ranged from 0.9 in financial activities to 2.8 in natural resources and mining; trade, transportation, and utilities; and education and health services. (See table 1.)
  • Two supersectors, with about 43 percent of private industry employment, accounted for 53 percent of the occupational injuries and illnesses: education and health services and trade, transportation, and utilities. (See table 2.)
  • In private industry, the TRC injury and illness incidence rate ranged from 0.7 for establishments employing fewer than 11 workers to 2.9 for establishments employing 50 to 249 workers. (See table 3.)
  • New York’s private industry TRC rate of 2.2 in 2019 was unchanged from 2018. (See table 4.)
Table A. Number and rate of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in private industry, United States and New York, 2019
Characteristic United States New York
Number
(in thousands)
Rate
(per 100 workers)
Number
(in thousands)
Rate
(per 100 workers)

Total cases

2,814.0 2.8 140.5 2.2

Cases with days away from work, job transfer, or restriction

1,558.2 1.5 78.4 1.2

Cases with days away from work

888.2 0.9 70.1 1.1

Cases with job transfer or restriction

670.0 0.7 8.2 0.1

Other recordable cases

1,255.7 1.2 62.2 1.0

Note: Because of rounding, components may not add to totals.

Private industry injury and illness case types

Of the 140,500 private industry injury and illness cases reported in New York, 78,400 were of a more severe nature, involving days away from work, job transfer, or restriction—commonly referred to as DART cases. These cases occurred at a rate of 1.2 cases per 100 full-time workers. Eight-nine percent of the DART cases in New York were incidents that resulted in at least one day away from work, compared to 57 percent nationally. Other recordable cases (those not involving days away from work, job transfer, or restriction) accounted for the remaining 62,200 cases in New York, at a rate of 1.0. In comparison, the national rate for other recordable cases was 1.2.

In New York, the professional and business services supersector had a significantly higher TRC incidence rate from the previous year. The education and health services supersector had significantly lower TRC and DART incidences rates from the previous year. No other private industry supersector had a significant change in its TRC or DART rate over the year.

In 2019, approximately 133,500 (95.0 percent) of private industry recordable injuries and illnesses were injuries. Workplace illnesses accounted for an additional 7,100 recordable cases.

State and local government injury and illness cases

In the state and local government sector in New York, 66,100 injury and illness cases were reported in 2019, resulting in a rate of 6.4 cases per 100 full-time workers. Nationally, the rate was 4.6. Seventy-nine percent of injuries and illnesses reported in New York’s public sector occurred among local government workers.

State estimates

Private industry and public sector estimates are available for 41 participating states and for the District of Columbia for 2019. The private industry injury and illness rate was statistically higher in 20 states than the national rate of 2.8 cases per 100 full-time workers, lower in 14 states and in the District of Columbia, and not statistically different in 7 states. (See chart 1.) Caution should be taken when comparing rates among states as some differences can be attributed to different industry composition within each state.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic Impact on the Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses

Estimates in this news release are for reference year 2019. No changes in estimation procedures or outputs were necessary due to COVID-19. Additional information is available at www.bls.gov/covid19/effects-of-covid-19-on-workplace-injuries-and-illnesses-compensation-andoccupational-requirements.htm.


Technical Note

The Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (SOII) is a Federal/State cooperative program that publishes estimates on nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses. Each year, approximately 200,000 employers report for establishments in private industry and the public sector (state and local government). In-scope cases include work-related injuries or illnesses to workers who require medical care beyond first aid. See the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) for the entire recordkeeping guidelines. The SOII excludes all work–related fatalities as well as nonfatal work injuries and illnesses to the self–employed; to workers on farms with 10 or fewer employees; to private household workers; to volunteers; and to federal government workers. For more information on the scope and sampling methodology see the SOII Handbook of Methods.

Additional occupational injury and illness data are available from our regional web page at www.bls.gov/regions/new-york-new-jersey/subjects.htm#tab-4.

Information in this release will be made available to sensory impaired individuals upon request. Voice phone: (202)-691-5200; Federal Relay Service: (800)-877-8339.

Table 1. Incidence rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry sector and case type, New York, 2019
Industry(1)(2)(3) Total recordable cases Cases with days away from work, job transfer, or restriction Other recordable cases
Total Cases with days away from work(4) Cases with job transfer or restriction

All industries including state and local government

2.8 1.5 1.4 0.1 1.2

Private industry

2.2 1.2 1.1 0.1 1.0

Goods-producing

2.5 1.6 1.4 0.3 0.9

Natural resources and mining

2.8 1.9 1.7 0.2 0.9

Construction

2.2 1.4 1.3 0.1 0.7

Manufacturing

2.7 1.8 1.4 0.4 1.0

Service-providing

2.2 1.2 1.1 0.1 1.0

Trade, transportation, and utilities

2.8 1.8 1.5 0.3 1.0

Information

1.4 0.9 0.8 0.1 0.6

Financial activities

0.9 0.3 0.3 (5) 0.6

Professional and business services

1.4 0.6 0.6 0.1 0.8

Education and health services

2.8 1.5 1.4 0.1 1.3

Leisure and hospitality

2.6 1.3 1.2 0.1 1.3

Other services, except public administration

1.8 1.1 1.1 - 0.7

State and local government

6.4 3.5 3.5 0.1 2.9

State government

7.2 4.5 4.4 0.1 2.7

Local government

6.3 3.3 3.3 0.1 2.9

Footnotes:
(1) Excludes farms with fewer than 11 employees.
(2) Data for mining (Sector 21 in the North American Industry Classification System,) include establishments not governed by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) rules and reporting, such as those in oil and gas extraction and related support activities. Data for mining operators in coal, metal, and nonmetal mining are provided to BLS by the Mine Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. Independent mining contractors are excluded from the coal, metal, and nonmetal mining industries. These data do not reflect the changes the Occupational Safety and Health Administration made to its recordkeeping requirements effective January 1, 2002; therefore estimates for these industries are not comparable to estimates in other industries.
(3) Data for employers in rail transportation are provided to BLS by the Federal Railroad Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation.
(4) Days-away-from-work cases include those that result in days away from work with or without job transfer or restriction.
(5) Data do not meet publication guidelines.

Note: Because of rounding, components may not add up to totals. Dashes indicate data not available.
Incidence rates represent the number of injuries and illnesses per 100 full-time workers and were calculated as: (N/EH) x 200,000 where: N = number of injuries and illnesses; EH = total hours worked by all employees during the calendar year; and 200,000 = base for 100 equivalent full-time workers (working 40 hours per week, 50 weeks per year). Data are coded using the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). For more information on the version of NAICS used in this year, see our Handbook of Methods concepts page: https://www.bls.gov/opub/hom/soii/concepts.htm.

Table 2. Numbers of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by selected industries and case types, New York, 2019 (numbers in thousands)
Industry(1)(2)(3) Total recordable cases Cases with days away from work, job transfer, or restriction Other recordable cases
Total Cases with days away from work(4) Cases with job transfer or restriction

All industries including state and local government

206.7 114.9 106.1 8.8 91.8

Private industry

140.5 78.4 70.1 8.2 62.2

Goods-producing

20.4 13.3 11.1 2.2 7.0

Natural resources and mining

0.7 0.5 0.4 0.1 0.2

Construction

8.1 5.3 4.9 0.5 2.7

Manufacturing

11.6 7.5 5.8 1.7 4.1

Service-providing

120.2 65.0 59.0 6.0 55.2

Trade, transportation, and utilities

34.3 22.1 18.9 3.2 12.2

Information

3.4 2.1 2.0 0.1 1.4

Financial activities

6.0 1.7 1.7 (5) 4.3

Professional and business services

16.6 7.7 7.1 0.6 8.9

Education and health services

40.3 21.2 19.7 1.5 19.1

Leisure and hospitality

15.0 7.4 6.9 0.5 7.6

Other services, except public administration

4.5 2.8 2.8 - 1.7

State and local government

66.1 36.5 36.0 0.5 29.6

State government

14.1 8.8 8.7 0.1 5.3

Local government

52.1 27.7 27.3 0.4 24.3

Footnotes:
(1) Excludes farms with fewer than 11 employees.
(2) Data for mining (Sector 21 in the North American Industry Classification System) include establishments not governed by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) rules and reporting, such as those in oil and gas extraction and related support activities. Data for mining operators in coal, metal, and nonmetal mining are provided to BLS by the Mine Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. Independent mining contractors are excluded from the coal, metal, and nonmetal mining industries. These data do not reflect the changes the Occupational Safety and Health Administration made to its recordkeeping requirements effective January 1, 2002; therefore estimates for these industries are not comparable to estimates in other industries.
(3) Data for employers in rail transportation are provided to BLS by the Federal Railroad Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation.
(4) Days-away-from-work cases include those that result in days away from work with or without job transfer or restriction.
(5) Data do not meet publication guidelines.

Note: Because of rounding, components may not add up to totals. Dashes indicate data not available. Data are coded using the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). For more information on the version of NAICS used in this year, see our Handbook of Methods concepts page: https://www.bls.gov/opub/hom/soii/concepts.htm.

Table 3. Incidence rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry sector and employment size, New York, 2019
Industry(1)(2)(3) All establishments Establishment employment size (workers)
1 to 10 11 to 49 50 to 249 250 to 999 1,000 or more

All industries including state and local government

2.8 0.8 2.1 3.4 3.3 3.5

Private industry

2.2 0.7 1.9 2.9 2.5 2.4

Goods-producing

2.5 - 2.4 3.2 2.6 1.6

Natural resources and mining

2.8 (4) 2.7 3.3 (4) -

Construction

2.2 - 2.5 2.8 2.4 1.4

Manufacturing

2.7 (4) 2.3 3.6 2.7 1.6

Service-providing

2.2 0.8 1.8 2.8 2.5 2.5

Trade, transportation, and utilities

2.8 0.3 2.5 3.5 4.0 3.9

Information

1.4 (4) 0.9 2.9 1.5 0.7

Financial activities

0.9 1.7 1.3 0.7 0.5 0.3

Professional and business services

1.4 - 1.7 1.3 1.2 1.1

Education and health services

2.8 - 1.4 3.4 3.2 3.4

Leisure and hospitality

2.6 - 1.9 3.9 4.9 3.7

Other services, except public administration

1.8 - 1.1 5.2 1.8 -

State and local government

6.4 - 8.6 6.6 7.1 5.8

State government

7.2 (4) 2.6 5.8 10.7 5.4

Local government

6.3 - 9.5 6.7 5.5 5.9

Footnotes:
(1) Excludes farms with fewer than 11 employees.
(2) Data for mining (Sector 21 in the North American Industry Classification System) include establishments not governed by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) rules and reporting, such as those in oil and gas extraction and related support activities. Data for mining operators in coal, metal, and nonmetal mining are provided to BLS by the Mine Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. Independent mining contractors are excluded from the coal, metal, and nonmetal mining industries. These data do not reflect the changes the Occupational Safety and Health Administration made to its recordkeeping requirements effective January 1, 2002; therefore estimates for these industries are not comparable to estimates in other industries.
(3) Data for employers in rail transportation are provided to BLS by the Federal Railroad Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation.
(4) Data do not meet publication guidelines.

Note: Because of rounding, components may not add to totals. Dashes indicate data not available.
Incidence rates represent the number of injuries and illnesses per 100 full-time workers and were calculated as: (N/EH) x 200,000 where: N = number of injuries and illnesses; EH = total hours worked by all employees during the calendar year; and 200,000 = base for 100 equivalent full-time workers (working 40 hours per week, 50 weeks per year). Data are coded using the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). For more information on the version of NAICS used in this year, see our Handbook of Methods concepts page: https://www.bls.gov/opub/hom/soii/concepts.htm.

Table 4. Incidence rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry sector and selected case type with measures of statistical significance, New York, 2018–19
Industry(1)(2)(3) Total recordable cases Cases with days away from work, job transfer, or restriction (4)
2018 2019 2018 2019

All industries including state and local government

2.7 2.8 1.6 1.5

Private industry

2.2 2.2 1.3 1.2*

Goods-producing

2.8 2.5 1.8 1.6

Natural resources and mining

4.7 2.8 2.1 1.9

Construction

2.8 2.2 1.9 1.4

Manufacturing

2.6 2.7 1.7 1.8

Service-providing

2.1 2.2 1.2 1.2

Trade, transportation, and utilities

2.6 2.8 1.8 1.8

Information

1.4 1.4 0.8 0.9

Financial activities

0.9 0.9 0.4 0.3

Professional and business services

0.9 1.4* 0.5 0.6

Education and health services

3.2 2.8* 1.7 1.5*

Leisure and hospitality

2.8 2.6 1.2 1.3

Other services, except public administration

1.6 1.8 0.7 1.1

State and local government

6.4 6.4 3.7 3.5

State government

6.3 7.2* 3.8 4.5*

Local government

6.4 6.3 3.7 3.3

Footnotes:
(1) Excludes farms with fewer than 11 employees.
(2) Data for mining (Sector 21 in the North American Industry Classification System) include establishments not governed by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) rules and reporting, such as those in oil and gas extraction and related support activities. Data for mining operators in coal, metal, and nonmetal mining are provided to BLS by the Mine Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. Independent mining contractors are excluded from the coal, metal, and nonmetal mining industries. These data do not reflect the changes the Occupational Safety and Health Administration made to its recordkeeping requirements effective January 1, 2002; therefore estimates for these industries are not comparable to estimates in other industries.
(3) Data for employers in rail transportation are provided to BLS by the Federal Railroad Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation.
(4) Days-away-from-work cases include those that result in days away from work with or without job transfer or restriction.

Note: Dashes indicate data not available.
Incidence rates represent the number of injuries and illnesses per 100 full-time workers and were calculated as: (N/EH) x 200,000 where: N = number of injuries and illnesses; EH = total hours worked by all employees during the calendar year; and 200,000 = base for 100 equivalent full-time workers (working 40 hours per week, 50 weeks per year).
* An asterisk indicates a significant difference between the current year and prior year values, when testing at 95% confidence level. Data are coded using the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). For more information on the version of NAICS used in this year, see our Handbook of Methods concepts page: https://www.bls.gov/opub/hom/soii/concepts.htm.

 

Last Modified Date: Thursday, January 07, 2021