State nonfatal occupational injury and illness incidence rates, private industry, 2011

December 05, 2012

In 2011, the total recordable case (TRC) injury and illness incidence rates were higher in 19 states than the national rate of 3.5 cases per 100 full-time workers, lower than the national rate in 12 states and in the District of Columbia, and not statistically different from the national rate in 10 states.  Data for establishments in the nine states for which individual estimates are unavailable are collected by BLS regional offices and used solely for the tabulation of national estimates.

State nonfatal occupational injury and illness incidence rates (per 100 full-time workers) compared to national rate, private industry, 2011

State nonfatal occupational injury and illness incidence rates (per 100 full-time workers) compared to national rate, private industry, 2011
StateInjury and illness rate (per 100 full-time workers)Compared to national rate of 3.5 (per 100 full-time workers)

Alabama

3.7Not statistically different from national rate

Alaska

4.5Greater than national rate

Arizona

3.2Less than national rate

Arkansas

3.4Not statistically different from national rate

California

3.5Not statistically different from national rate

Colorado

Data not availableData not available

Connecticut

4.5Greater than national rate

Delaware

2.9Less than national rate

District of Columbia

1.9Less than national rate

Florida

Data not availableData not available

Georgia

2.9Less than national rate

Hawaii

3.5Not statistically different from national rate

Idaho

Data not availableData not available

Illinois

3.2Less than national rate

Indiana

4.2Greater than national rate

Iowa

4.3Greater than national rate

Kansas

3.9Greater than national rate

Kentucky

4.2Greater than national rate

Louisiana

2.5Less than national rate

Maine

5.7Greater than national rate

Maryland

3.0Less than national rate

Massachusetts

3.2Less than national rate

Michigan

3.8Greater than national rate

Minnesota

3.7Not statistically different from national rate

Mississippi

Data not availableData not available

Missouri

3.4Not statistically different from national rate

Montana

5.0Greater than national rate

Nebraska

3.9Greater than national rate

Nevada

3.9Greater than national rate

New Hampshire

Data not availableData not available

New Jersey

3.0Less than national rate

New Mexico

4.2Greater than national rate

New York

2.9Less than national rate

North Carolina

3.1Less than national rate

North Dakota

Data not availableData not available

Ohio

Data not availableData not available

Oklahoma

3.9Greater than national rate

Oregon

3.8Greater than national rate

Pennsylvania

4.1Greater than national rate

Rhode Island

Data not availableData not available

South Carolina

3.3Not statistically different from national rate

South Dakota

Data not availableData not available

Tennessee

3.5Not statistically different from national rate

Texas

2.7Less than national rate

Utah

3.6Not statistically different from national rate

Vermont

5.0Greater than national rate

Virginia

2.9Less than national rate

Washington

4.9Greater than national rate

West Virginia

3.9Greater than national rate

Wisconsin

4.2Greater than national rate

Wyoming

3.6Not statistically different from national rate

Among those states for which 2011 data are available, Maine recorded the highest injury and illness incidence rate at 5.7 per 100 full-time workers.  The District of Columbia registered the lowest rate at 1.9.  Differences in the composition of industries within each state account for some of the differences across states.

Compared with 2010, private industry TRC incidence rates among the 41 states and the District of Columbia for which estimates are available in 2011 declined in 7 states, rose in 1 state, and remained statistically unchanged in 32 states and in the District of Columbia (estimates for Pennsylvania for 2010 were not available for comparison).

These data are from the Injuries, Illnesses, and Fatalities program. To learn more, see "Workplace Injuries and Illnesses — 2011" (HTML) (PDF), news release USDL‑12‑2121.

SUGGESTED CITATION

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, The Editor's Desk, State nonfatal occupational injury and illness incidence rates, private industry, 2011 on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2012/ted_20121205.htm (visited April 20, 2014).

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