February 13, 2012 (The Editor’s Desk is updated each business day.)

Extended mass layoff events, 2011

Extended mass layoff events and total separations, private nonfarm, 1996–2011
Layoff events Separations

1996

4,760 948,122

1997

4,671 947,843

1998

4,859 991,245

1999

4,556 901,451

2000

4,591 915,962

2001

7,375 1,524,832

2002

6,337 1,272,331

2003

6,181 1,216,886

2004

5,010 993,909

2005

4,881 884,661

2006

4,885 935,969

2007

5,363 965,935

2008

8,259 1,516,978

2009

11,824 2,108,202

2010

7,247 1,257,134

2011(p)

6,331 1,045,220

Footnotes:
(p) = preliminary

These data are featured in the TED article, Extended mass layoff events, 2011.

 

Extended mass layoff events, reasons for layoff, private nonfarm, 2011
Reason for layoff Layoff events

Business demand

2,268

Contract completion

1,387

Slack work/insufficient demand/non-seasonal business slowdown

752

Contract cancellation

108

Excess inventory/saturated market

12

Import competition

5

Domestic competition

4

Seasonal

2,188

Financial issues

401

Organizational changes

299

Production specific

90

Disaster/safety

30

Other/miscellaneous

1,055

These data are featured in the TED article, Extended mass layoff events, 2011.

 

 

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