Average time spent caring for household children, 2006–2010

September 02, 2011

For the combined years from 2006 to 2010, adults living in households with children under 6 spent an average of 2.0 hours per day providing primary childcare—childcare done as a main activity, such as physical care of children and reading to or talking with children—to household children.

Time spent caring for household children under 18, by activity and age of youngest child, average for the combined years 2006–2010
[Chart data]

For the combined years from 2006 to 2010, adults living in households where the youngest child was between the ages of 6 and 17 spent less than half as much time providing primary childcare to household children—47 minutes per day.

Among adults living in households with children under 6, for the combined years from 2006 to 2010, women spent an average of 1.1 hours per day providing physical care (such as bathing or feeding a child) to household children; by contrast, men spent 26 minutes providing physical care.

These data are from the American Time Use Survey. To learn more, see "American Time Use Survey — 2010 Results" (HTML) (PDF), news release USDL-11-0919.

SUGGESTED CITATION

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, The Editor's Desk, Average time spent caring for household children, 2006–2010 on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2011/ted_20110902.htm (visited September 03, 2014).

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