Worker fatalities in eating and drinking places

June 18, 2002

In 1999, worker fatalities in the eating and drinking places industry were up by about a third from the previous year. This was the first increase in the industry since 1993.

Fatal occupational injuries in eating and drinking places, 1992-1999
[Chart data—TXT]

Despite the increase in 1999, both the number and rate of on-the-job fatalities in eating and drinking places declined over the 1992-99 period. In 1999, 147 workers in the industry were fatally injured, down from 191 workers in 1992.

Homicides were the leading cause of worker fatalities in the eating and drinking places industry in the 1992-99 period. Almost three-quarters of fatalities were homicides during the period.

Eating and drinking places are defined as establishments where customers purchase prepared, ready-to-eat meals, buy and drink alcoholic beverages, or both. Meals are either eaten on the premises, taken out, or delivered.

The BLS Injuries, Illnesses and Fatalities Program produced these data. Find more information in Occupational Hazards in Eating and Drinking Places (PDF 163K), by Timothy Webster, Compensation and Working Conditions.

SUGGESTED CITATION

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, The Editor's Desk, Worker fatalities in eating and drinking places on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2002/jun/wk3/art02.htm (visited September 01, 2014).

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