Hours worked for women with children rise

September 22, 1999

Women with children worked more hours each week on average in 1998 than they did in 1969, with the largest increase reported for women with children between the ages of 6 and 17.

Average weekly hours at work for workers age 25-54 by age of youngest child and sex, 1969 and 1998
[Chart data—TXT]

From 1969 to 1998, hours worked of women with children age 6 to 17 increased by 2.5 hours per week. Average weekly hours at work rose by 1.4 hours for women with children age 3 to 5, and 0.6 hour for women with children under 3.

Over the 1969-98 period, hours worked for men with children declined, especially men with children under 3. Average weekly hours were down by 0.8 hour for men with children under 3, by 0.3 hour for men with children age 3 to 5, and by 0.1 hour for men with children age 6 to 17.

The data used in this article were produced by the Current Population Survey. Find out more in chapter 3 of Report on the American Workforce 1999 (PDF 1,037K).

SUGGESTED CITATION

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, The Editor's Desk, Hours worked for women with children rise on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/1999/sept/wk4/art03.htm (visited September 17, 2014).

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