Article

September 2013

Green Goods and Services survey: results and collection

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In 2011, green goods and services manufacturing jobs accounted for 4.3 percent of all private manufacturing employment in the United States, as measured by the QCEW program. The largest green goods and services employment within manufacturing in 2011 was found in the ventilation, heating, air-conditioning and commercial refrigeration equipment manufacturing industry group (NAICS 3334), with 42,242 green goods and services jobs. This industry group includes the assembly or production of ENERGY STAR-certified appliances. The iron and steel mills and ferroalloy manufacturing (NAICS 3311) and pulp, paper, and paperboard mills (NAICS 3221) industries had the second and third most green goods and services employment within manufacturing, 33,812 and 32,032, respectively.

The manufacturing sector experienced a green goods and services employment growth of 14,183 (2.9 percent). The expansion of green goods and services jobs within manufacturing jobs was driven by the following industry groups: semiconductor and other electronic component manufacturing (NAICS 3344) with 4,963 additional green goods and services jobs, foundries (NAICS 3315) with 1,862 additional green goods and services jobs, and electric lighting equipment manufacturing (NAICS 3351) with 1,816 additional green goods and services jobs. Together, these three industry groups accounted for 60.9 percent of the green goods and services job growth in manufacturing.

Construction had 487,709 green goods and services jobs in 2011, comprising 8.9 percent of the sector’s employment. The sector underwent the largest increase in green goods and services employment from 2010 to 2011, with 101,932 additional green goods and services jobs (26.4 percent). (See table 1 and figure 2.) The composition of employment in construction changed in 2011, because the share of jobs associated with green goods and services significantly increased. Over the year, the total private sector construction employment (as measured by the QCEW program) decreased from 5,489,499 to 5,473,045 (–16,454), while green goods and services jobs increased by 101,932, resulting in a green goods and services percent increase from 7.0 percent in 2010 to 8.9 percent in 2011 (see figure 3).

Within the construction sector, the most significant increase in green goods and services employment occurred in the building equipment contractors industry group (NAICS 2382), which added 29,667 green goods and services jobs (18 percent) between 2010 and 2011. Establishments in the building equipment contractor’s industry group provide green services such as the installation of green-certified products or ENERGY STAR-certified heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (also known as “HVAC”) systems. Residential building construction (NAICS 2361) experienced the second largest increase in green goods and services employment in 2011 within construction, with an additional 25,518 green goods and services jobs. This growth contributed to this industry (NAICS 2361) group’s green goods and services percent growth from 5.5 percent to 10.1 percent. Together, building equipment contractors and residential building construction accounted for 54.1 percent of the green goods and services employment growth in construction. The expansion of green goods and services jobs in construction can be attributed in part to an increase in requirements that new buildings adhere to industry-certified green standards.3

Notes

3 See U.S. Green Building Council article at http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=1852.

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About the Author

Amanda L. Chadwick
chadwick.amanda@bls.gov

Amanda L. Chadwick, formerly an economist in the Office of Employment and Unemployment Statistics, is a program analyst in the Office of Administration, Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Mark DeWolf

Mark DeWolf, formerly an economist in the Office of Employment and Unemployment Statistics, Bureau of Labor Statistics, is a financial economist with the Bureau of the Fiscal Service, U.S. Department of the Treasury.

Nicholas A. Fett
fett.nicholas@bls.gov

Nicholas A. Fett is an economist in the Office of Employment and Unemployment Statistics, Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Robert L. Viegas
viegas.robert@bls.gov

Robert L. Viegas, formerly an economist in the Office of Employment and Unemployment Statistics, is a program analyst in the Office of Field Operations, Bureau of Labor Statistics.